Yesterday, as I'm sure you noticed, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump on charges of "incitement of an insurrection." The final vote was 232-197, with 10 Republican House members voting to impeach.

The move by the House yesterday makes President Trump the first U.S. president to be impeached not once, but twice. And, if my research is correct (having quadruple-checked myself at the websites of the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Fox News and CNN, I think it is), this impeachment goes down as the most bi-partisan impeachment vote in our country's history. 10 Republicans voted to impeach Trump yesterday, while only 5 Democrats voted to impeach Bill Clinton in 1998.

Here are the 10 Republicans who voted in favor of impeachment (Fox News):

  1. Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming
  2. Rep. Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio
  3. Rep. Jamie Herrera-Beutler of Washington
  4. Rep. John Katko of New York
  5. Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois
  6. Rep. Peter Meijer of Michigan
  7. Rep. Dan Newhouse of Washington
  8. Rep. Tom Rice of South Carolina
  9. Rep. Fred Upton of Michigan
  10. Rep. David Valadao of California

16th District Congressman Adam Kinzinger is a monthly guest on the WROK Morning Show, and he joined us on Thursday morning to discuss his impeachment vote. Normally, we cover a variety of topics when Congressman Kinzinger joins the show, but right now, this story is the biggest one not only here, but worldwide, so this was a rare one-topic discussion.

What was his reason for voting yes to impeachment when President Trump only has a few days left in his term?

How long did it take for Congressman Kinzinger to decide which direction to go, and what specifically made him choose to vote yes?

What's the reaction from the 16th District to his vote? What does he anticipate the fallout to be?

Now that his vote has been cast, does Congressman Kinzinger regret his choice?

Take a listen as Congressman Kinzinger answers those questions and more:

 

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