You may not have heard much about the Avian Flu that's been showing up around the world and devastating populations of chickens, turkeys, bald eagles, penguins, and more. You'll be hearing more about it very soon, since it's now in 27 states, including Illinois.

The birds you see in the photo above are double-crested cormorants, and 200 of them have been found dead from H5N1 avian flu at Baker's Lake Nature Preserve north of Dundee Road in Barrington.

Double-crested cormorant, Getty Images
Double-crested cormorant, Getty Images
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Cormorant snares a catfish a the Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve
Double-crested cormorant, Getty Images
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Have You Noticed That Chicken And Egg Prices Are On The Rise? It's Not A Coincidence

According to a report in the Washington Post, the Avian Flu has infected nearly 27 million chickens and turkeys in the United States, forcing many farmers to “depopulate” their animals to prevent a further spread. I'm guessing that you've figured out what "depopulate" means.

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And that's where the price increases come in. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) says that the price of a dozen eggs in November hovered around $1. If you've looked recently, the price is closing in on $3.00 per dozen.

Chicken prices are also on a rapid climb, since 23 million birds have been destroyed in the U.S. since the beginning of the outbreak.

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Getty Images
Getty Images
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It's A Nightmare For The Birds And For The People Who Buy Eggs And Chickens, But There Is One Piece Of Good News

That, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is that the H5N1 Avian Flu "poses little to no risk to humans."

Other states have had more problems with the bird flu, but Illinois is just now getting hit with it.

Patch.com:

The outbreak was first detected in Illinois in Will County in March when three Canada geese were found to be infected. Several local zoos in the Chicago area have moved their birds inside to avoid exposing them to the outbreak of the avian flu, the Tribune reported.

The Emiquon Preserve, located on the Illinois River in Fulton County, also announced last month that it was closed to the public after a preliminary analysis found that bird flu was likely present in a dead snow goose on the property. The preserve reopened about 10 days later.

LOOK: Here are the pets banned in each state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to states, some organizations, including The Humane Society of the United States, advocate for federal, standardized legislation that would ban owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets.

Read on to see which pets are banned in your home state, as well as across the nation.

WATCH OUT: These are the deadliest animals in the world