This morning, on the WROK Morning Show, Joe and I were discussing the latest news out of the western part of the US--in particular, the incredibly heavy snowfalls being experienced by Colorado, Idaho, and other neighboring states. Hundreds of roofs have collapsed, with hundreds more in danger of collapse. That discussion led us to Rockford's winter of 1979.

The winter of 78-79 saw 74.5 inches of snow dropped on the stateline, with the snow reaching a depth of 27 inches in January of 1979. Those of us old enough will probably recall shoveling driveways and sidewalks--then heading up to do the roof. After my dad made me do our house, the neighbors thought I did such a good job that my dad sent me over to do their houses, too.

For better or for worse, we just don't seem to have those kinds of massive snowfalls around here anymore, as Rockford has averaged 36.7 inches of snow per season for the last 30 years. That number is 14.3 inches above the national average, 22.4 inches.

Some other notable numbers regarding Rockford's weather:

  • According to WeatherDB, Rockford's all-time record snowfall for one day was 16.0 inches on March 3, 1985 - 2.0 inches less than the national average for snowfall records.
  • Rockford's greatest snowfall total from one snowstorm is 16.3 inches on January 6th and 7th, 1918.
  • According to Weather.gov, Rockford's coldest wind-chill was -72 on January 20, 1985.
  • The least amount of snowfall for a season in Rockford was 2.8 inches in the winter of 1906-1907.
  • Rockford's highest one-day temperature reading was 112 degrees on July 14, 1936.
  • Rockford's coldest one-day temperature reading was -27 on January 10, 1982.
  • Rockford's warmest month ever was August of 1921, when the average temperature was 80.6 degrees.
  • Rockford's coldest month ever was January of 1912, when the average temperature was 4.7 degrees.

One more note about snow gathering on rooftops: at least we don't have the sorts of adventures that they seem to regularly enjoy in Russia:

And this dude, of course, meant to do this, right?