The Better Business Bureau's charity arm Wise Giving Alliance (Give.org) teamed up with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and other public officials to denounce misleading charities.

Is it so much to ask that when you make a charitable contribution to an organization the organization uses the majority of your money to help people?

Let me answer my own question. Yes, sometimes it is too much to ask.

Some veterans charities are being accused of misleading those who donate to them, or at the very least, not being forthcoming about how they do business.

“This information is vital and timely in light of it being Military Consumer Month,” said Dennis Horton, director of the Rockford Regional Office of the Better Business Bureau. “BBB urges everyone to thoroughly check out charities on Give.org before donating money to anyone. We hold the utmost respect for our veterans and find charities that mislead donors wanting to support those who serve our country especially alarming.”

Below are the charity reports on the six veterans’ charities referenced by the FTC and state officials. These charities did not disclose any of the requested information to BBB WGA. I've attached a link to each name so you can see what problems they've had:

Foundation for American Veterans

Healing American Heroes (aka Help Our Wounded)

Healing Heroes Network

Help the Vets (aka: American Disabled Veterans Foundation, Military Families of America, Veterans Fighting Breast Cancer)

National Vietnam Veterans Foundation

VietNow

For an explanation of how Give.org accredits charities, and a list of veterans/military charities that do things the right way, click here.